By Brigid Edmunds - [email protected]

‘Gilmore Girls: A Year in the Life’ hits Netflix Nov. 25

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From left: Kelly Bishop, Alexis Bledel and Lauren Graham arrive at the premiere of “Gilmore Girls: A Year in the Life” on Friday, Nov. 18 in Los Angeles.
AP photo

“Gilmore Girls” fans can finally let a out a sigh of relief; “Gilmore Girls: A Year in the Life” premieres on Friday.

The long anticipated four-part mini-series will hit Netflix Nov. 25, and after much anticipation, fans will finally be able to hear the anticipated four words creator Amy Sherman-Palladino envisioned would end the show.

It seems fans across the country (and the world) are gearing up for a Gilmore worthy binge session to watch the revival, with businesses turning into “Luke’s diners” for a day, to even hosting Gilmore trivia nights.

So how does a show which ended almost 10 years ago retain a loyal fan base and even engage a new generation?

The show’s fast-paced dialogue and endless pop culture references made it stand out when it originally aired. From a Madeleine Albright cameo to movie marathons to include classics such as “Casablanca” to “Kill Bill” and “Pulp Fiction,” “Gilmore Girls” managed to stay both relevant and timeless after all these years.

In fact, fans and news outlets are picking up on a line Lorelai tells Luke that she’ll see him “when Hillary’s president.”

Netflix might have played a key role in the hype too, long before they announced the revival. Netflix picked up the original seven seasons in Oct. 2014, and a new wave of fans came along with it. The streaming service has already revived other popular shows, such as “Arrested Development” and “Fuller House,” so when Gilmore fans were able to binge-watch the entire series, it re-energized the conversation of a reboot.

Sherman-Palladino and her husband and collaborator, Daniel Palladino, left the show abruptly in 2006 after contract disputes and the show was cancelled after a lackluster seventh season. With both Sherman-Palladino and her husband on board, as well as almost the full original cast, the time was right to revisit Stars Hollow.

Fans from Northeastern Pennsylvania have been preparing for the premiere. Zummo’s Cafe, located on Marion Street in Scranton, held a Gilmore Girls trivia night Nov. 17 and 18 as a fundraiser for the Alzheimer’s Association.

Krista Somers, 28, of Scranton, is the events manager for the association and a huge fan of the show. She noticed some friends going to similar events in New York City and decided to bring a similar event to her hometown.

“The interest was phenomenal,” Somers said. “We ended up adding a second night.”

Somers and Zummo’s general manager, Lindsay Colan, coordinated to bring the event to life. The cafe transformed into a real-life Luke’s Diner and participants donned “Team Dean,” “Team Jess,” and “Team Logan” pins, representing which of Rory’s boyfriends was their favorite (Jess was winning by a landslide.)

For Laura Ancherani, 36, of Waverly, “Gilmore Girls” has always been a big part of her life.

“I’m a huge fan,” she said, “I named my daughter Lorelai.”

Ancherani said she thought the event was a great idea.

“It’s a lot of fun,” she said.

As for watching the premiere, said her family will be on vacation when it comes out.

“I will be watching it on my laptop,” she laughed.

From left: Kelly Bishop, Alexis Bledel and Lauren Graham arrive at the premiere of “Gilmore Girls: A Year in the Life” on Friday, Nov. 18 in Los Angeles.
http://theweekender.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/web1_AP16324257568419.jpgFrom left: Kelly Bishop, Alexis Bledel and Lauren Graham arrive at the premiere of “Gilmore Girls: A Year in the Life” on Friday, Nov. 18 in Los Angeles. AP photo
‘Gilmore Girls: A Year in the Life’ hits Netflix Nov. 25

By Brigid Edmunds

[email protected]

Reach Brigid Edmunds at [email protected]

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Reach Brigid Edmunds at [email protected]