By Gene Axton - [email protected]

Pokemon pulling people into public comes with pluses, pitfalls

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If it weren’t for "Pokemon Go," Ashley Nichols said she’d be inside playing with her dog. The King’s University student was exploring Wilkes University’s campus, catching Pokemon and gathering items at Pokestops.
Sarah Haase | Weekender
The clock tower in Wilkes-Barre Village along South Main St. is a Pokestop in the mobile game "Pokemon Go." Once tapped, Pokestop icons can be spun, yielding a number of items that can be used to obtain more Pokemon.
Sarah Haase | Weekender
This male Nidoran (the genders are denoted by symbol) can be caught and evolved into Nidorino, and eventually Nidoking. Players can evolve Pokemon by transfering duplicates.
Sarah Haase | Weekender
This view of Wilkes-Barre’s Public Square shows the main game screen of "Pokemon Go." The avatar will run along the map as the player moves in real life. Blue diamonds represent Pokestops. The large red icon is a gym and can be entered to do battle against other Pokemon trainers. Gyms can also be blue or yellow and always show the most powerful Pokemon at the gym on top.
Sarah Haase | Weekender
This Venonat, seen on Wilkes-Barre’s Public Square, can be caught and evolved into a Venomoth. Most Pokemon have one form they can evolve into once they reach a certain CP level; some have another beyond that.
Sarah Haase | Weekender
Chad Pokita (left), Dom Nolan and Joe Limbcoplos visited Scranton’s Courthouse Square Monday, June 12 to catch Pokemon. Soon after the app’s release, they spent a night hunting the virtual creatures at Marywood University that almost resulted in an injury to Nolan.
Gene Axton | Weekender
Scranton resident Blaise Pantuso, 21, said he was in the city’s Courthouse Square from 8 p.m. Sunday, July 10 until 6 a.m. the next morning catching Pokemon. Pantuso said he doesn’t leave his home much, but "Pokemon Go" has motivated him to explore public areas.
Gene Axton | Weekender
Scranton resident Blaise Pantuso, 21, plays "Pokemon Go: on his Android device. Pantuso was playing the Pokemon television show theme song on repeat through a Bluetooth-enabled speaker in his backpack.
Gene Axton | Weekender

When “Pokemon Go” players visit Scranton’s Courthouse Square for items and wild Pokemon, they may hear the television show’s theme song playing faintly in the background. It isn’t a hallucinatory side effect of too much catching ‘em all — it’s 21-year-old Blaise Pantuso. He has the song repeating over and over again through a Bluetooth speaker in his backpack.

“I’ve been playing ‘Pokemon Go’ for two days striaght now,” said Pantuso, who

sat charging his phone and himself in the Courthouse Square shade on Monday.

The Pokeball beanie-clad trainer said he hadn’t played a core game in the Pokémon franchise for years, but “Pokemon Go” had him in the square from 8 p.m. July 10 until 6 a.m. the next morning.

Dom Nolan, 25, who was in the square the same time as Pantuso, said the song attracted a small following as Pokemon masters lived the show they watched as children.

Play it safe

On the night of July 8, Nolan’s search for an elusive Pokemon called Electabuzz took him to Marywood University; it was also a brush with the real-life dangers associated with the app.

“I almost died,” Nolan said. “There was a giant pot hole and I almost stepped in it and tripped into traffic. It was pitch black.”

The game uses GPS and cell phone cameras to integrate reality into a virtual experience (a practice in gaming known as augmented reality). Players are forced to frequently look at their phone’s display and follow a map that indicates locations of interest. It’s built to be played while walking, so it advises players to be alert when walking around busy streets and private property.

The app can be just as tempting to drivers as it is to pedestrians.

Nanticoke resident Ashley Nichols admittedly checked to see if any Pokemon were around while stopped at a red light. She said if she does want to interact with the app she’ll pull over to the side of the road, but even playing it safe comes with its own hazards.

“I pulled over in Plymouth and I got a nail in my tire, so I have to take care of that now,” Nichols said.

Train your Pokemon, train yourself

Scranton resident Chad Pokita, 25, was hunting alongside Nolan. When asked if the game motivated him to visit areas he didn’t frequent, he admitted it drove him to explore one area in particular: the outdoors. For Pantuso, the game hasn’t just gotten him outside; it has gotten him into better shape.

“I’m six pounds lighter,” Pantuso said. “I weighed myself this morning. I try to walk every day but I mainly only do a half hour. This is crazy.”

The game has helped him become more social.

“I’ve added 30 new contacts in my phone already,” he said.

Scranton’s downtown area may attract so many players because of its monuments and landmarks, but Wilkes-Barre is anything but barren when it comes to “Pokemon Go.” The city’s Franklin Street YMCA is one of dozens of Pokestops in the downtown area — although they didn’t know it.

Linda Reilly, community health director for Wilkes-Barre YMCA, was also familiar with the Pokemon franchise but was surprised to hear the health facility was integrated into its latest entry.

“I think it’s great. It sounds like a great way to keep people active,” she said. “It seems like a really engaging thing, especially if families do it together. It could be a good bonding experience between family members — parents against the kids, competing as you go along.”

Wilkes-Barre residents Joe Cresho and Emily Flatt said they’re naturally active people, but they’ve had a little extra motivation since the release of “Pokemon Go.”

“We usually go out, but now we have even more of a reason to,” Cresho said.

So far the two have hunted Pokemon in a number of places, including South Philadelphia and Scranton’s The Marketplace at Steamtown, but Flatt said her favorite place to Poke-watch was Wilkes-Barre’s Kirby Park.

“I love seeing everyone out of their houses at the park,” Flatt said.

It’s educational too

Nichols visited multiple areas in her hunting. After the King’s College student finished exploring her own campus, she made laps around Wilkes University, hitting Pokestops and catching Pokemon.

“Those blue historical markers are (Poke)stops too,” said Nichols, comparing the app to a city-wide scavenger hunt. “You see them all over the place but no one really ever stops to read them. Hopefully people will now.”

For some players, the goal is to control gyms. After players reach level 5, they can join one of three teams (blue, yellow or red) and visit designated spots on their map (like the Kings College bell across from Times Leader’s offices) to battle against other players. The gyms, along with PokeStops and wild Pokémon, form the basic gameplay elements of the Pokémon GO experience.

Whether they’re trying to “catch ‘em all” or training to take over gyms, Northeastern Pennsylvania “Pokemon Go” trainers of have a long road ahead if they want to catch ‘em all and tackle every gym, but the streets of Scranton and Wilkes-Barre have more Pokestops and Pocket Monsters than original series starting point, Pallet Town, and they can be uncovered through exploration and a little bit of luck.

TRAINER TIPS

1: Visiting a Pokestops on the map gives players free in-game items that can help catch Pokemon (like Pokeballs and berries). These items would otherwise have to be purchased from the in-app store once depleted from the inventory. Pokestops refresh quickly after they’re used, so stock up on the consumables in public places like Wyoming Valley Mall or downtown Wilkes-Barre

2: The ring that shows up in front of a Pokemon indicates its capture difficulty. Green means easy to catch, yellow is a bit harder, orange is harder still and red is the most difficult. Raise capture probability by using items

3: Level up and evolve Pokemon with candy. Candy is gained by transferring duplicate Pokemon. Don’t transfer your most powerful pocket monsters — always transfer Pokemon with lower CP (combat point) levels. The higher the CP, the stronger the Pokemon

4: During battle, tap the screen to perform a basic attack. Special attacks can be performed when the blue bar under a Pokemon’s health is filled to the spot required by each move

5: Team members can store Pokemon at gyms owned by their team and earn “gym defender” bonuses every day their Pokemon remains there. Visit the shop tab to collect the bonus. To capture a gym, challenge its trainers to lower the gym’s prestige number. When the number reaches zero, the gym will become available.

6: Eggs gained at Pokestops must be placed in an incubator to hatch. Incubate eggs by walking; higher required distance means rarer and stronger Pokemon. Distance will be counted if slowly riding a bike or skateboard, but the game will not count distances crossed at higher speeds

7: “Pokemon Go” is hard on battery life; make sure phones are fully charged and, if possible, bring back-up batteries. Also, be mindful of the world outside the phone

8: To start with Pikachu, walk around and ignore the first three Pokemon at the game’s beginning. After a few minutes, Pikachu will appear.

Reach Gene Axton at 570-991-6121.

Sarah Haase contributed to this article.

After the “Pokemon Go” app used 21st century technology to turn a forgotten fad into Internet sensation, players are visiting real-life spaces in Scranton, Wilkes-Barre and beyond to collect and train their virtual creatures.

By Gene Axton

[email protected]

If it weren’t for “Pok√©mon Go,” Ashley Nichols said she’d be inside playing with her dog. The King’s University student was exploring Wilkes University’s campus, catching Pokemon and gathering items at Pokestops.
http://theweekender.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/web1_AshleyNichols-1.jpgIf it weren’t for “Pokemon Go,” Ashley Nichols said she’d be inside playing with her dog. The King’s University student was exploring Wilkes University’s campus, catching Pokemon and gathering items at Pokestops. Sarah Haase | Weekender

The clock tower in Wilkes-Barre Village along South Main St. is a Pokestop in the mobile game “Pokemon Go.” Once tapped, Pokestop icons can be spun, yielding a number of items that can be used to obtain more Pokemon.
http://theweekender.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/web1_clocktower-1.jpgThe clock tower in Wilkes-Barre Village along South Main St. is a Pokestop in the mobile game “Pokemon Go.” Once tapped, Pokestop icons can be spun, yielding a number of items that can be used to obtain more Pokemon. Sarah Haase | Weekender

This male Nidoran (the genders are denoted by symbol) can be caught and evolved into Nidorino, and eventually Nidoking. Players can evolve Pokemon by transfering duplicates.
http://theweekender.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/web1_Nidorano-1.jpgThis male Nidoran (the genders are denoted by symbol) can be caught and evolved into Nidorino, and eventually Nidoking. Players can evolve Pokemon by transfering duplicates. Sarah Haase | Weekender

This view of Wilkes-Barre’s Public Square shows the main game screen of “Pokemon Go.” The avatar will run along the map as the player moves in real life. Blue diamonds represent Pokestops. The large red icon is a gym and can be entered to do battle against other Pokemon trainers. Gyms can also be blue or yellow and always show the most powerful Pokemon at the gym on top.
http://theweekender.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/web1_PokeMap-1.jpgThis view of Wilkes-Barre’s Public Square shows the main game screen of “Pokemon Go.” The avatar will run along the map as the player moves in real life. Blue diamonds represent Pokestops. The large red icon is a gym and can be entered to do battle against other Pokemon trainers. Gyms can also be blue or yellow and always show the most powerful Pokemon at the gym on top. Sarah Haase | Weekender

This Venonat, seen on Wilkes-Barre’s Public Square, can be caught and evolved into a Venomoth. Most Pokemon have one form they can evolve into once they reach a certain CP level; some have another beyond that.
http://theweekender.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/web1_Venonat-1.jpgThis Venonat, seen on Wilkes-Barre’s Public Square, can be caught and evolved into a Venomoth. Most Pokemon have one form they can evolve into once they reach a certain CP level; some have another beyond that. Sarah Haase | Weekender

Chad Pokita (left), Dom Nolan and Joe Limbcoplos visited Scranton’s Courthouse Square Monday, June 12 to catch Pokemon. Soon after the app’s release, they spent a night hunting the virtual creatures at Marywood University that almost resulted in an injury to Nolan.
http://theweekender.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/web1_pokebros-untoned.jpgChad Pokita (left), Dom Nolan and Joe Limbcoplos visited Scranton’s Courthouse Square Monday, June 12 to catch Pokemon. Soon after the app’s release, they spent a night hunting the virtual creatures at Marywood University that almost resulted in an injury to Nolan. Gene Axton | Weekender

Scranton resident Blaise Pantuso, 21, said he was in the city’s Courthouse Square from 8 p.m. Sunday, July 10 until 6 a.m. the next morning catching Pokemon. Pantuso said he doesn’t leave his home much, but “Pokemon Go” has motivated him to explore public areas.
http://theweekender.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/web1_pokefan-looking-untoned.jpgScranton resident Blaise Pantuso, 21, said he was in the city’s Courthouse Square from 8 p.m. Sunday, July 10 until 6 a.m. the next morning catching Pokemon. Pantuso said he doesn’t leave his home much, but “Pokemon Go” has motivated him to explore public areas. Gene Axton | Weekender

Scranton resident Blaise Pantuso, 21, plays “Pokemon Go” on his Android device. Pantuso was playing the Pokemon television show theme song on repeat through a Bluetooth-enabled speaker in his backpack.
http://theweekender.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/web1_pokefan-playing-untoned.jpgScranton resident Blaise Pantuso, 21, plays “Pokemon Go: on his Android device. Pantuso was playing the Pokemon television show theme song on repeat through a Bluetooth-enabled speaker in his backpack. Gene Axton | Weekender
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Reach Gene Axton at 570-991-6121. - Sarah Haase contributed to this article.

TRAINER TIPS

1: Visiting a Pokestops on the map gives players free in-game items that can help catch Pokemon (like Pokeballs and berries). These items would otherwise have to be purchased from the in-app store once depleted from the inventory. Pokestops refresh quickly after they’re used, so stock up on the consumables in public places like Wyoming Valley Mall or downtown Wilkes-Barre

2: The ring that shows up in front of a Pokemon indicates its capture difficulty. Green means easy to catch, yellow is a bit harder, orange is harder still and red is the most difficult. Raise capture probability by using items

3: Level up and evolve Pokemon with candy. Candy is gained by transferring duplicate Pokemon. Don’t transfer your most powerful pocket monsters — always transfer Pokemon with lower CP (combat point) levels. The higher the CP, the stronger the Pokemon

4: During battle, tap the screen to perform a basic attack. Special attacks can be performed when the blue bar under a Pokemon's health is filled to the spot required by each move

5: Team members can store Pokemon at gyms owned by their team and earn "gym defender" bonuses every day their Pokemon remains there. Visit the shop tab to collect the bonus. To capture a gym, challenge its trainers to lower the gym's prestige number. When the number reaches zero, the gym will become available.

6: Eggs gained at Pokestops must be placed in an incubator to hatch. Incubate eggs by walking; higher required distance means rarer and stronger Pokemon. Distance will be counted if slowly riding a bike or skateboard, but the game will not count distances crossed at higher speeds

7: "Pokemon Go" is hard on battery life; make sure phones are fully charged and, if possible, bring back-up batteries. Also, be mindful of the world outside the phone

8: To start with Pikachu, walk around and ignore the first three Pokemon at the game’s beginning. After a few minutes, Pikachu will appear.