By Gene Axton and Matt Mattei - [email protected] - [email protected]

NEPA residents weigh in on new reboot “Fuller House”

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Tyler Miller of Berwick is looking forward to watching “Fuller House” after getting a good recommendation from his brother.
Matt Mattei | Times Leader
From left: Sisters Kayla Bernstein of Plains and Samantha Gall of Nanticoke are watching “Fuller House” at different paces.
Matt Mattei | Times Leader
From left, Jodie Sweetin, Andrea Barber, Lori Loughlin and Candace Cameron-Bure attend the premiere of “Fuller House” on Feb. 16 in Los Angeles.
AP photos
From left, Bob Saget, John Stamos and Dave Coulier attend the premiere of “Fuller House” on Feb. 16 in Los Angeles.
AP photos
Ainslee Golomb, 23, of Mountain Top, wasn’t a fan of the original “Full House” series.
Gene Axton | Times Leader
Scranton resident Keith Richardson, 28, enjoyed the original run of “Full House.”
Gene Axton | Times Leader
This image released by Netflix shows, from left, Andrea Barber, Jodie Sweetin, and Candace Cameron Bure in a scene from, “Fuller House,” streaming on Netflix beginning on Feb. 26.
AP photos

Pop culture refuses to cut. it. out.

On Feb. 26, Netflix released “Fuller House,” the reboot of a nostalgic sitcom gem that ran from 1987 to 1995. The 13-episode first season invites viewers back into the lives of the iconic characters from the original “Full House.”

“It’s like we grew up together,” Kayla Bernstein said of the original cast.

“Full House” followed three well-intentioned but often ill-equipped men, Danny Tanner, Uncle Jesse and Joey, raising three bubbly little girls, D.J., Stephanie and Michelle.

In the reboot, viewers are reunited with most of the cast and we’re invited back into their lives.

We last left the Tanners, with D.J. getting ready for prom and Michelle having just recovered her memory after an equestrian accident. It’s impossible to pick up where we left off after a 21-year commercial break, but from the characters and aesthetic who love to hug (so much hugging), “Fuller House” is a time machine on a television screen. D.J. is recently widowed, and she’s raising her three sons, now with help from sister Stephanie and best friend Kimmy Gibler. Gibler’s character has a daughter of her own and all live in a house filled with laughter, love and life lessons.

Bernstein, 22 of Plains, and her sister, Samantha Gall, 18, of Nanticoke, are watching “Fuller House” at the same time but at different paces.

“It brings back memories,” Gall said. “It’s exciting. I like the new version. I just don’t like how everybody’s not in it.”

Loveable Michelle Tanner, played by Ashley and Mary-Kate Olsen did not return to the new series. In its first episode, the cast addresses Michelle’s absence by saying she’s busy with her fashion career in New York City — a nod to the real-life Olsens.

Wilkes-Barre resident, Mango Powell, said he watched his first episode because his girlfriend’s son likes the show.

“It was different, because you saw them as kids and now (they’re) all grown up handling life,” Powell said. “You try to visualize them from that time. I was a little older, but my little brothers used to watch it.”

But really, didn’t everyone watch it? According to an Associated Press article, the two-hour block of “Full House” reruns on Nick at Nite brings in 1 million viewers in prime time, and viewership is up nearly 20 percent with adults ages 18-34 over the same period last year — an indication to Netflix that people are not only watching but that they’re also binge-watching it.

Bernstein is a binger.

She said she appreciates how the new show pokes fun of its predecessor and how it bridges the gap between studio audience and television viewer by addressing the audience.

“They bring all the old jokes back, like Stephanie with her ‘how rude,’” Bernstein said. “They break down the ‘fourth wall’ and acknowledge they’re a TV show.”

There are a few people who have not tuned in.

The original show never caught the attention of 23-year-old Mountain Top resident Ainslee Golomb. While her contemporaries were jamming out to Jesse and the Rippers, (Uncle Jesse’s band) she was more concerned with dino DNA.

“I couldn’t get into it. I was more into ‘Jurassic Park,’” she said.

Keith Richardson, 28, has yet to watch an episode of “Fuller House,” but he recalls the original fondly.

“I thought it was a pretty good show,” Richardson said.

The Scranton resident said he was surprised the show was revived.

It most likely won’t be the last either. From “X-Files” and “Twin Peaks” reboots to “Voltron” and “Pee-Wee” reimaginings, the entertainment industry is diving deep into the nostalgia mine to lure millennials with re-polished gold. Highly-regarded franchises are being revisited on a higher-than-normal frequency thanks to accessible streaming services, reminiscent online articles and a viewership that’s willing to spend extra time and money on both.

Residents react to the reboot of the sitcom with which they grew up

By Gene Axton and Matt Mattei

[email protected]

[email protected]

Tyler Miller of Berwick is looking forward to watching “Fuller House” after getting a good recommendation from his brother.
http://theweekender.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_TylerMiller-1.jpgTyler Miller of Berwick is looking forward to watching “Fuller House” after getting a good recommendation from his brother. Matt Mattei | Times Leader

From left: Sisters Kayla Bernstein of Plains and Samantha Gall of Nanticoke are watching “Fuller House” at different paces.
http://theweekender.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_BernsteinAndGall-1.jpgFrom left: Sisters Kayla Bernstein of Plains and Samantha Gall of Nanticoke are watching “Fuller House” at different paces. Matt Mattei | Times Leader

From left, Jodie Sweetin, Andrea Barber, Lori Loughlin and Candace Cameron-Bure attend the premiere of “Fuller House” on Feb. 16 in Los Angeles.
http://theweekender.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_fullerhouse2-1.jpgFrom left, Jodie Sweetin, Andrea Barber, Lori Loughlin and Candace Cameron-Bure attend the premiere of “Fuller House” on Feb. 16 in Los Angeles. AP photos

From left, Bob Saget, John Stamos and Dave Coulier attend the premiere of “Fuller House” on Feb. 16 in Los Angeles.
http://theweekender.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_fullerhouse3-1.jpgFrom left, Bob Saget, John Stamos and Dave Coulier attend the premiere of “Fuller House” on Feb. 16 in Los Angeles. AP photos

Ainslee Golomb, 23, of Mountain Top, wasn’t a fan of the original “Full House” series.
http://theweekender.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_fuller-house-1.jpgAinslee Golomb, 23, of Mountain Top, wasn’t a fan of the original “Full House” series. Gene Axton | Times Leader

Scranton resident Keith Richardson, 28, enjoyed the original run of “Full House.”
http://theweekender.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_Fuller-House-2-1.jpgScranton resident Keith Richardson, 28, enjoyed the original run of “Full House.” Gene Axton | Times Leader

This image released by Netflix shows, from left, Andrea Barber, Jodie Sweetin, and Candace Cameron Bure in a scene from, “Fuller House,” streaming on Netflix beginning on Feb. 26.
http://theweekender.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_fullerhouse1-1.jpgThis image released by Netflix shows, from left, Andrea Barber, Jodie Sweetin, and Candace Cameron Bure in a scene from, “Fuller House,” streaming on Netflix beginning on Feb. 26. AP photos
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