By Melissa Hughes - For Weekender

Girl Talk: Parent of not, the struggle is real

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Melissa Hughes

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    We are living in a world where people shame their fellow man about virtually everything. Thin people make a mockery of the obese. Overweight folk thin-shame the skinny. There are religious wars, political battles, even warm verses cold weather lovers filling my Facebook feed daily.

    When did we all get so offended? Can’t we all just get along?

    One morning while scrolling through pages of New Year’s resolutions, animal memes and political commentary, I saw a post that said “people without children can’t understand the meaning of exhaustion.”

    Clearly this was just the rantings of a mother who was having a rough day, but it sparked a firestorm in the comment section.

    Someone had commented that they work multiple jobs and even without children are up and moving from morning until night to try to make a living. Someone else had said even as a house wife she feels burnt out by the end of the day so she can only imagine the hardships of a mother who still has to put in a shift elsewhere while keeping the house going. Another person found this offensive to the point of making a mockery out of the initial poster’s life choices. Meanwhile, I just sat back and reflected on my own feelings regarding the situation.

    I am a mother. I work five jobs. I’m tired. My house isn’t always clean, my dishes are sometimes piled in the sink and sometimes I have to wash the same load of laundry three times because I just don’t have the time to remember to put it in the dryer. I am on the go from sun up to sun down whether its due to my jobs or my daughter’s activities. I can understand and relate to this woman feeling burnt out.

    Does that give me the right to discredit her exhaustion? Absolutely not.

    We all have our own rat race.

    Life is tough.

    Who are we to say one person’s life is more or less exhausting than someone else’s? Some of my friends are marathon runners and even though they have no children they are up at dawn exercising before work. Other friends have multiple children and spend their days running all over town to appointments and practices and still try to run the house and manage to create memories with their children.

    It is not a them versus us battle between parents and non-parents. We live in a fast paced society with high expectations on everyone. We are all just trying to make it. Next time you see a frustrated mother’s post and it offends you, scroll by or offer her a word of encouragement. If you see a friend complaining about a missed deadline or a difficult situation, give them a smile.

    We are all in this together.

    It is not me verses you or him verses her, it is all of us trying to survive.

    Melissa Hughes is a 30-year-old single mother of one. Girl Talk started as a telltale horror story of the city’s most epic dating disasters and evolved into a column about love, life experiences and growing up. Melissa has a weekly TV segment on PA Live, WBRE, discussing activities in Weekender and a Girl Talk radio segment every Wednesday on 98.5 KRZ.

    By Melissa Hughes

    For Weekender

    Melissa Hughes
    http://theweekender.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/web1_girltalk-1.jpgMelissa Hughes

    Melissa Hughes is a 30-year-old single mother of one. Girl Talk started as a telltale horror story of the city’s most epic dating disasters and evolved into a column about love, life experiences and growing up. Melissa has a weekly TV segment on PA Live, WBRE, discussing activities in Weekender and a Girl Talk radio segment every Wednesday on 98.5 KRZ.